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Sunday, May 28, 2017

Hitting: Loading on the back side

Before you jump up as high as you can, you squat down. Before you throw the baseball ball forward, you bring your arm backward. Before you hit, you get loaded on your back side.

The belly button is a good point of reference for where a player's weight is. In the picture of Derek Jeter above, notice that his belly button is directly over the inside of his back knee. This is completely loaded. The player below is another example. Although his belly button may not be directly over the inside of the back knee, it is close enough.

Getting into this position should be rhythmic and smooth. Most young players are anxious at the plate and as a result, do what I call a "violent load." The load should be slow, smooth, and early. I would always watch the pitchers hands, and when he broke his hands to come home with the pitch, I would start my slow load.

When the load is slow and early the head stays still during the flight of the ball. When the head stays still, the eyes see the ball better. Now the ball looks like a softball instead of an aspirin. When players quickly load, stride, and swing all in the same violent motion, the ball appears faster than it really should. Brian Berger- ABC Holiday Camp Director, Owner Youth Baseball Edge

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Hitting: Loading on the back side

Before you jump up as high as you can, you squat down. Before you throw the baseball ball forward, you bring your arm backward. Before you hit, you get loaded on your back side.

The belly button is a good point of reference for where a player's weight is. In the picture of Derek Jeter above, notice that his belly button is directly over the inside of his back knee. This is completely loaded. The player below is another example. Although his belly button may not be directly over the inside of the back knee, it is close enough.

Getting into this position should be rhythmic and smooth. Most young players are anxious at the plate and as a result, do what I call a "violent load." The load should be slow, smooth, and early. I would always watch the pitchers hands, and when he broke his hands to come home with the pitch, I would start my slow load.

When the load is slow and early the head stays still during the flight of the ball. When the head stays still, the eyes see the ball better. Now the ball looks like a softball instead of an aspirin. When players quickly load, stride, and swing all in the same violent motion, the ball appears faster than it really should. Brian Berger- ABC Holiday Camp Director, Owner Youth Baseball Edge